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SAGE Courses

ARC 201 Introduction to American Architecture

Terms offered: Fall, Spring

3 credits

This course examines the stylistic characteristics, architectural details, and social influences associated with American architecture with particular emphasis on common genres found in southeastern New England. Buildings and structures are viewed as artistic entities, characterized by various formal predilections including the handling of the massing, facade composition, surface treatment, artistic handling of detail and the like. The interconnectivity between stylistic developments, advances in building technology and economic influences (including green building practices) and the cultural aesthetics are investigated.

Prerequisite: None

Fees: Instructional Support fee applies.

EGR 102 Introduction to Sustainable and Green Energy Technologies

Terms offered: Fall, Spring

3 Credits

This course is designed to introduce students to emerging renewable energy technologies and sustainable building design practices. Both the practical applications and underlying theories are addressed. Topics include: The Construction/Engineering Design and Implementation Process, Green Building Practices, especially those related to Energy Efficiency, Environmental Conservation, and Resource Management, Wind Turbines, Solar Energy, and other forms of renewable energy. Three lecture hours per week.

Prerequisite: None

Fees: Instructional Support fee applies.

EGR 123 Green Building Practices

Terms offered: Fall

3 credits

This course studies the methods, materials, and equipment used in the construction of residential and commercial green buildings. It introduces fundamental concepts of building design and delivery including siting, water efficiency, energy efficiency, sustainable materials and resources and environmental and the proper use, selection and specifications, strength and limitations, and code conformity of basic construction materials and fabrication processes. The laboratory includes fieldwork and basic construction and evaluation procedures. This course is appropriate for those seeking LEED Green Associate Certification. Three class hours and two laboratory hours a week.

Pre- or co-requisite: MTH 141 or MTH 151 or higher.

Fees: Instructional Support fee applies.

EGR 124 Soils and Foundations

Terms offered: Spring

4 credits

This course introduces students to geotechnical engineering. Engineering soil properties, mass/volume relationships, soil classification systems, and site exploration methods are included. In addition, structural foundations are explored. Three lecture hours a week.

Prerequisite: MTH 031 or high school algebra recommended

EGR 172 Material Science

Terms offered: Fall

4 credits

A study of the physical, mechanical, and chemical properties of materials. The course places particular emphasis on the interdependency of atomic structure, microstructure, material phase relationships, and solid state reactions to each other and to the modification of these properties. It investigates the use of metals, plastics, and advanced materials in economic, sustainable, and reliable design. The laboratory includes metallographic examination using light microscopy and the study of material science principles and treatments of metals. Three class hours and three laboratory hours a week.

Prerequisite: None

Fees: Instructional Support Fee applies

EGR 183 Energy Efficiency and Conservation Measures

3 credits

This course is designed to give students the skills to identify and understand energy efficiency and conservation methods used to reduce energy consumption. Students analyze residential and commercial facilities for opportunities to employ these energy-saving measures. Students become familiar with the use of energy monitoring and measuring equipment used for energy auditing. Students also learn to calculate energy savings and determine environmental impacts of these energy saving methods.

EGR 236 Renewable Energy Applications

Terms offered: Spring

4 credits

This course introduces students to renewable sources of energies and technologies. The benefits, limitations and environmental impacts of various technologies are examined. Students also learn how to perform an economic and environmental analysis of proposed systems. Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week.

Prerequisite: EGR 101, pre/co-requisite MTH 141 or MTH 171 and MTH 214.

Fees: Instructional Support Fee applies.

EGR 282 Wind Power

Terms offered: Spring

4 credits

This course provides an in-depth introduction to wind as a sustainable form of energy. It examines the history, current applications, and future of wind power. The course looks at the process for siting, developing, constructing, operating, and maintaining wind energy projects of different scales--from home and small commercial turbines to large municipal and utility scale wind farms. In the classroom, students gain a basic understanding of the fundamental science of wind and an up-to-date knowledge of the equipment and techniques used in industry. While in the laboratory, students develop the hands-on skills necessary to support the safe and effective harnessing of wind power. Three class hours and three laboratory hours per week.

Prerequisite: EGR 131 or EGR 151 or permission of the instructor.

Fees: Instructional Support fee applies.


EGR 284 Solar Power

Terms offered: Spring

4 credits

This course provides an in-depth introduction to solar energy as a sustainable form of power and how it can be utilized for a variety of energy demand applications in residential, commercial, and municipal buildings. The benefits and limitations of various common solar energy technologies used to produce heat, hot water, and electricity are examined. The course looks at the process of siting, sizing and designing of solar hot water and solar photovoltaic electric systems and how to perform an economic and environmental analysis of proposed systems. In the classroom, students gain a basic understanding of the fundamental science of heat and energy and an up-to-date knowledge of the equipment and techniques used in the solar industry. While in the laboratory, students develop the hands-on skills necessary to evaluate, install and maintain solar power systems. Three lecture and three laboratory hours per week.

Prerequisite: EGR131 or EGR 151 or permission of the instructor.

Fees: Instructional Support fee applies.


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